Thursday, May 3, 2012

The Shining Ones - Book Review


As I have completed reading my 11th novel this year, which is beyond record setting for me this year, I have a yearning to extend my book reviews beyond the one paragraph summary I've been doing thus far.  I've been able to stick to my New Year’s Resolution to read more and it’s delightful to remember that there’s a whole other world out there written down to explore.  Reading has affected me in more than one way no doubt but the way my mind leaves the “real world” and emerges into a book is extremely relieving.  The tires and rigors of a job can be pushed aside while the sometimes mundane daily occurrences in life can be overshadowed.  To conclude this introduction I suppose what I’m getting at is I recommend to incorporate reading into your life, its far more worthwhile than I remember from the years ago when I read more often.

                This is the second book of “The Tamuli” and you’re probably wondering why I chose to begin my book reviews in the middle of a series.  I actually didn't put any thought into sharing the books I've read as much that’s why.  I own books 1 – 3 of this Tamuli series to get a taste of what the fantasy genre is all about.  I’ve owned these books for around 10 years at least and finally cracked them open while blowing off an inch of dust.  I’ve always been a science fiction person and most likely will be until the day I die, there’s so much possibility in the unknown of that universe that enthralls me.  My experience in the fantasy universe has left me wanting to branch out to at least one more genre of books.

                The author, David Eddings, writes amazingly well.  I couldn't explain in words actually how well it’s written, that’s why I’m not the author.  It’s a fantasy novel but it doesn't read like it most times.  What I mean is that it’s easy to read and an extensive background in folklore or goblins isn't at all necessary.  I've always had the predetermined idea that fantasy books weren't educational enough to be worthwhile reading, basically.  I never had that complete thought in my mind until I chose to put it into words for sake of this review but I more or less was thinking it.  It’s quite interesting the things you can learn to help improve yourself in a positive way through reading such a book as this.  I’m not talking about how to kill a ten foot troll but how you can improve your conversational skills which I’m not at all highly skilled in. 

                I’d hate to ruin a novel such as this by spoiling it for you so I won’t.  If you find yourself wanting to break off from a bad habit or simply change things up in life I’d look no further than reading.  The Tamuli series is as good a place to begin as any so get cracking.

                I’ll leave you with a bit of a tease as to how this story goes.  In the world that is created by David Eddings an evil has already been stirring up trouble here and there.  Ancient armies of long past are rising from the dead to serve an evil cause.  A well known hero named Sparhawk with the aid of his allies will do what they can to defeat the evil in their world.  There is also something else that makes this story somewhat different, Bhelliom.  What is it and how does it make this book unlike a typical “hero must save the world” story is up to you to read for yourself.



                Here is the back of the book summary in case I didn't quite interest you enough in it.